Scanning The Skyline: 10 Bizarre Barcode Buildings


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] In cities where highways and high-rises have taken up virtually every square foot of real estate there is to be had, lush parks, pedestrian walkways and bike paths can be hard to come by. That’s why, in many cities, supporters of public green space are starting to look up, and they’re reclaiming and rehabilitating abandoned infrastructure in the process. New York City’s The High Line has inspired cities across the world to consider disused railways and viaducts as elevated parks, and rooftop recreation spots are increasing in popularity, too. The High Line, New York City A rail track that was decommissioned in 1980, standing in disrepair as an eyesore for decades, is now one of New York City’s most popular attractions after its transformation into an elevated park. The High Line is a one-mile section of the former New York Central Railroad spur called The West Side, running along the lower west side of Manhattan, offering views of the city and the Hudson River along with walkways, naturalist plantings, and spots to rest.
For full version, visit http://weburbanist.feedsportal.com/c/34699/f/637598/s/30b4b3bb/sc/10/l/0Lweburbanist0N0C20A130C0A90C0A20Cleisure0Ein0Ethe0Esky0E130Erailway0Erooftop0Eparks0C0J3Futm0Isource0J3Dmediafed0J26utm0Imedium0J3Dfeed0J26utm0Icampaign0J3Dfeed0Emain0J26utm0Icontent0J3Dunknown0J26utm0Iterm0J3Dfeed0Etitle/story01.htm

Shtrikh Kod Building, St. Petersburg, Russia (images via: Eikongraphia ) Shtrikh Kod means “Barcode Building” in Russian, which is appropriate since there’s really no other way to describe it. The edifice, located in historic St. Petersburg, was designed by Vitruvius & Sons Studio and it was completed in 2007. (image via: Eikongraphia ) Kudos to photographer Alexey Naroditsky for capturing the stark yet striking exterior of the Barcode Building. It should be noted that one of the commenters at the Eikongraphia website where Naroditsky’s images are on display opined that “The facade’s hue is close to that of the red 633nm laser light commonly used in bar code scanners.” Coincidence?
For full version, visit http://weburbanist.feedsportal.com/c/34699/f/637598/s/30a8ebcb/sc/32/l/0Lweburbanist0N0C20A130C0A90C0A10Cscanning0Ethe0Eskyline0E10A0Ebizarre0Ebarcode0Ebuildings0C0J3Futm0Isource0J3Dmediafed0J26utm0Imedium0J3Dfeed0J26utm0Icampaign0J3Dfeed0Emain0J26utm0Icontent0J3Dunknown0J26utm0Iterm0J3Dfeed0Etitle/story01.htm

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